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20121001
20121009
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
out. they would prefer to have barack obama cleaning up barack obama this week, rather than joe biden cleaning him up. >> what do you think? vice-presidential debate is coming up. >> it just so happens that joe biden and paul ryan respect each other and get along very well. there were debt negotiations with those two were the ones that had the best rapport of all the participants. i think it will be a fun and enjoyable debate. joe biden has a good sense of humor. you are not going to see him and barack obama in the debate. >> i hope it is an existing debate. there were 50 million people watching the first debate. the question i have is, for how long? i was sitting there thinking, ok, obama did not show up to play. this is unbelievably boring. if i did not have to do this for a living, i would watch a show that i wanted to. >> it depends on your perspective. i found it fascinating. i was seized. my attention did not lapse for an hour-and-a-half. i think he might be slightly skewed. if you saw the joe biden clip, how does a man of uncertain age maintain such a high level of indignation,
on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philos
, barack obama and mitt romney are getting ready for their first face-to-face spar on television. the two presidential nominees have spent hours learning lines and performing mock debates in order to beat their opponent and win over a television audience of tens of millions. critics will be watching as we move and listening to every move. what can they learn from their predecessors? the first television debate was in black and white in 1960. it was argued that john f. kennedy had shown richard nixon mainly because of the way he looked on screen. do these debates boil down to style over substance? we're joined by brian callahan who coaches government and industry leaders in public speaking. how much do looks matter in this? if nixon had sweated less in that clip that we just saw, would he have done better? >> i think he would have. particularly since it was the dawn of television and people were getting visual cues for the first time. when senator kennedy looked much more comfortable than nixon, that played very much to his advantage. >> well, let's take a look at the presidential debate n
economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, and job gains for july and august were revised upward by 86,000 the president touted the numbers in a campaign stop at george mason university in fairfax, virginia. >> now, every month reminds us that we've still got too many of our friends and neighbors who are looking for work. there are too many middle class families that are still struggling to pay the bills. they were struggling long before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. >> brown: that was a s
that romney and not obama had promised to increase defense spending. only 23% were aware that payroll taxes had decreased during obama's term in office. only slightly more than half knew that paul ryan is the republican vice presidential nominee. the director of the annenberg center, kathleen hall jamieson, our master media decoder is back with us. welcome. >> thank you. >> so who's responsible for the widespread unawareness or ignorance that you report in your survey? is it the candidate, the media, or the voter? >> it's all three. and fortunately, we have the opportunity with presidential debates to do something that reliably increases knowledge. we've been studying presidential debates for a long time as a scholarly community. and to our surprise, we consistently find that those who watch debates, regardless of the level of knowledge they come in with, come out with more accurate knowledge as a general group. and they do this because those who haven't paid a great deal of attention have a lot to learn. those of us who've paid a lot of attention still missed things. the news may have cove
the same way he does but they tend not to want to go public. there are two more presidential debates. they will be yet another hoax unless someone puts the question to barack obama and mitt romney, why are we killing kids that don't need to die and then ask it over and again untilthey don't need to die and then ask it over and again untilthey have no choice but to go public. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> that's it for this week. on our next edition of "moyers and company" meet the adventure remember who has gone to the top of the earth to take the earth's temperature and some beautiful photographs. from the vanishing areas of north. we're talking about global warming. >> that landscape is gone. it may never be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)